Ride is scheduled

aftCG

Well-known member
Location
Tacoma, WA
#1
Well I've finally got a date with a DPE. April 20 which will give me some time to brush up on regs and knowledge that may be dusty. I'm flying a few times per week in my Citabria but the DPE won't do rides in tail draggers. So I've got a C172N booked for that day. Of course since I haven't rented from this FBO in a year or two I'll take my 43rd C172 check out flight on April 5th. I'm planning on having the CFI beat me up on maneuvers so I get my moneys worth.
 

donv

Active member
Location
Portland, OR
#4
I'd find a DPE who will do it in a taildragger-- that's what I did. Shouldn't be that hard to find-- the first one I called was willing to do it.

I also did an online CFI recurrent program, which was well worth it in terms of both refreshing my knowledge and teaching me about things which have come on the scene since I was last current as a CFI (and really, since I was last teaching, which was many years before that). Things like IACRA, etc. Knowing the current areas of emphasis and the difference between ACS and PTS was important too.

In many ways, the flying was the easiest part of the process. It was the part I was least concerned with. The one maneuver I really struggled with was (and is) 8s on Pylons. The DPE pointed out to me that when I got my commercial and CFI, in the mid-1980s, 8s on Pylons were not a required maneuver. So I had never learned them in the first place. She was nice and didn't make me do one for checking purposes, although she did have me demonstrate one on a non-graded basis.
 

Clifford Daly

Well-known member
#5
Good luck!

I did mine in my 172 just because it was so easy to “teach” the examiner. Less to mess up when you can start the plane and see what they’re doing. When I’m in the backseat of my citabria there a lot of instruments I can’t see so it would definitely be a little harder to knock it out to the standards.

Also... much easier to “teach” a soft field or short field in a Cessna than a tailwheel.
 

donv

Active member
Location
Portland, OR
#6
I think, for me, doing it in a 172 would have been more difficult. Two reasons-- 1) I had a level of familiarity and comfort with the airplane which the DPE didn't, which made it harder for her to ask me about things I didn't know, and 2) since I owned the Citabria, I was able to fly it a lot in preparation for the ride-- rather than one or two flights in a 172. I basically took any of my friends with a pilot certificate and put them in the front, and flew around a bunch. A former airline pilot friend of mine was particularly helpful in this regard.

I told the DPE in advance that when I'm in the back seat, I can see EITHER the altimeter or the airspeed, but not both at the same time, so to factor that in. I also got a long retractable pointer on Amazon which is really helpful for instructing in the tandem configuration. With it, I can point at whatever it is that I want the student to do or see on the panel.

Finally, I learned how to adjust the trim (at least somewhat) using my foot, which really helped a great deal. It's not very precise, but way better than nothing.
 

aftCG

Well-known member
Location
Tacoma, WA
#7
I'd find a DPE who will do it in a taildragger-- that's what I did. Shouldn't be that hard to find-- the first one I called was willing to do it.

I also did an online CFI recurrent program, which was well worth it in terms of both refreshing my knowledge and teaching me about things which have come on the scene since I was last current as a CFI (and really, since I was last teaching, which was many years before that). Things like IACRA, etc. Knowing the current areas of emphasis and the difference between ACS and PTS was important too.

In many ways, the flying was the easiest part of the process. It was the part I was least concerned with. The one maneuver I really struggled with was (and is) 8s on Pylons. The DPE pointed out to me that when I got my commercial and CFI, in the mid-1980s, 8s on Pylons were not a required maneuver. So I had never learned them in the first place. She was nice and didn't make me do one for checking purposes, although she did have me demonstrate one on a non-graded basis.
I've got a hangar neighbor with a Husky who took his reinstatement ride, but he had to fly to eastern Oregon to do it (and be work friends through SWA). Last year about this time we had DPEs vaporize, either through retirement or FAA action. And apparently not all DPEs can do a reinstatement ride.

I feel almost like the 172 is cheating and maybe that's what you refer to. I'm going to take the opportunity and go with it.

I too had been sweating the 8s on pylons but did go out in my Citabria one day and find some lonely trees in a clear cut area and got it out of my system. Also went back and hit chandelles and Lazy 8s until they feel normal.
 

aftCG

Well-known member
Location
Tacoma, WA
#8
I think, for me, doing it in a 172 would have been more difficult. Two reasons-- 1) I had a level of familiarity and comfort with the airplane which the DPE didn't, which made it harder for her to ask me about things I didn't know, and 2) since I owned the Citabria, I was able to fly it a lot in preparation for the ride-- rather than one or two flights in a 172. I basically took any of my friends with a pilot certificate and put them in the front, and flew around a bunch. A former airline pilot friend of mine was particularly helpful in this regard.

I told the DPE in advance that when I'm in the back seat, I can see EITHER the altimeter or the airspeed, but not both at the same time, so to factor that in. I also got a long retractable pointer on Amazon which is really helpful for instructing in the tandem configuration. With it, I can point at whatever it is that I want the student to do or see on the panel.

Finally, I learned how to adjust the trim (at least somewhat) using my foot, which really helped a great deal. It's not very precise, but way better than nothing.
I think I must have learned the foot trick from you here on this forum. A couple of weeks ago now I met one of my former students who has a Sportsman Amphib, and we did some plane swapping. I would have put him up front except the two strips we were operating from were basically landing gear width and not excessively long. So we agreed he would come to my home airport at a later date, were the runway is 100' wide and 5002' long.
I had him do almost all the flying from the back. When I told him about using his foot for trim he tried it and said it worked very well.